YQNA Meeting: CANCELLED!


OUR MARCH 18 MEETING HAS BEEN
CANCELLED OVER PUBLIC HEALTH CONCERNS



MANY THANKS TO THE SCHEDULED SPEAKERS

Issues for future meetings:
 

  • Pivotal flood control meeting, March 3rd and urgent follow-up
  • Proposed pipeline dig meets stiff opposition on Queens Quay
  • Billy Bishop Airport to measure noise on the Waterfront
  • Waterfront BIA and Harbourfront Centre news

Thanks to the Radisson Admiral Hotel for their generosity and hospitality!

Join our mailing list to receive meeting reminders: YQNA.ca  Email: info@YQNA.ca

YQNA: No Pipeline Dig on Queens Quay

The central Waterfront became Toronto’s foremost recreational area when Queens Quay West was redesigned in 2015. Millions of visitors enjoy the beauty and vibrant cultural life, and it is a favourite place to live.

Now Enbridge Gas is proposing to dig up Queens Quay to install a 4.5 kilometre gas pipeline from Cherry Street in the east to Bathurst Street in the west. The company invited the public to an open house on January 23 to show people three potential routes to dig open trenches, hoping to start in spring of 2021. One is Lake Shore Boulevard, another detours along Harbour Street, and finally Enbridge’s first choice: Queens Quay, digging up the bike lanes with damage to sidewalks, trees and more.

As a reminder of what we paid $130 million for five years ago, take a look:

York Quay Neighbourhood Association (YQNA) strongly objects to digging up Queens Quay, our award-winning promenade on the Waterfront. It would have a crushing effect on the area, which is home to over 70,000 and serves tourists and the GTA at large. Not only would millions of tax-payer dollars be squandered, but Harbourfront Centre, tour boats, businesses and condo towers would all suffer. Instead we recommend using Harbour Street, which would affect far fewer businesses and people and is still being developed.

Please speak up now if this concerns you, and spread the word.
Email Enbridge Gas though Dillon Consulting Ltd.: NPS20Replacement@dillon.ca
Copy City Councillor Joe Cressy at councillor_cressy@toronto.ca and info@yqna.ca

High Water Levels Threaten Waterfront

                                                                                                                    Photo: braziliandanny/imgur

There’s too much water in the Great Lakes—and with Lake Ontario being the lowest in elevation, it receives so much from the others that it has flooded coastlines and developments. It is challenging to restrict the flow of water from rivers, rain and spring run-off, but Lake Ontario levels have been successfully regulated in the past by the Moses-Saunders dam at Cornwall.

The Toronto Islands and numerous downtown buildings in Toronto have suffered millions of dollars in damage from flooding, especially in 2017 and 2019. Experts are concerned that unprecedented water levels are part of climate change and not a seasonal or passing problem. If so, more attention and new solutions are needed urgently, because an additional foot of water in the spring could top the already high levels at our doorstep. To learn more, YQNA put flooding first on the agenda in the November 19, 2019 meeting.

If lake levels can be controlled, who is in charge? Canada and America negotiated the Boundary Waters Treaty act in 1909, and the International Joint Commission (IJC) was established with three representatives from each country looking after this precious freshwater resource. In 1956, the IJC approved building of the Moses-Saunders Dam and the St. Lawrence Seaway, and release of water through the dam regulated water levels successfully for decades. Later, lobbying from various interest groups led to a new IJC plan for regulating water levels. It was implemented in 2017, and maximum levels gradually rose to a record high of 75.92 m, four feet above the average lake level.

From the detailed information that YQNA has gathered, it seems that IJC urgently needs to get ahead of next year’s forecast. YQNA has appealed for action from IJC and other parties with an active role and has informed major parties who would suffer financial losses in case of widespread flooding. Join the action by forwarding our letter to Councillor Joe Cressy (councillor_cressy@toronto.ca) and Mayor John Tory (mayor_tory@toronto.ca) and others on our list of recipients.

New Flood Studies

Please be informed that three New Basement Flooding Improvements Studies have initiated for the area of “St Clair Ave to the Lake/Jane-Keele St to Don Valley Parkway.”

Kindly direct your members to www.toronto.ca/bf42 to take the initial survey in order to help the City in determining the source of the flooding.  This is a first step to the study process.

A notice and newsletter (contains more information) are being emailed to BIAs and Ratepayer Associations for forwarding to their members.

The analysis includes curbside-survey (catchbasins), sewer modelling and technical analysis. In the coming months, the studies will determine the locations and size of sewer upgrades, underground storage, wet/dry ponds and other solutions to reduce the risk of future flooding. More details and updates are at www.toronto.ca/bfea.

General Information:

1.    The study areas were determined by the underground sewershed (wastewater drainage system).  The drainage (sewer) systems for these three “bundled” Study Areas are: Mid-Town Interceptor, High Level Interceptor and Low Level Interceptor (trunk sewers). Due to the size of this bundle with over 100,000 homes and buildings, and the Ontario Class Environmental Assessment process, the study will take a few years to complete.

2.    Other flood protection initiatives are already underway, e.g. “find and fixes” of sewer infiltrations and leaks.  The City also has a subsidy of $3,400 Basement Flooding Protection Program (BFPP) for homeowners who install flood protection devices.  More information is at www.toronto.ca/basementflooding.

We will provide more details and updates in the coming months.